Recent Changes

Thursday, May 27

  1. page Ms. Lapidot Blalock edited Hello! I Welcome to Art at Lincoln School! My name is Sarah Blalock, and I am the art teacher…
    Hello!
    I
    Welcome to Art at Lincoln School!
    My name is Sarah Blalock, and I
    am the art teacher, Sarah Blalock.teacher. I have
    ...
    working with studentskids of all
    ...
    in all mediums.kinds of media. One of my favorite things about my job is being able to see the students learn and grow from year to year.
    I have
    ...
    and furniture.
    If you have any questions or concerns, please
    I also love combining art and craft by sewing, bookmaking, and making stuff in general.
    Please feel free to
    email me
    Here are some examples of my artwork:
    {encaustic.jpg} {nesting.jpg} {raspberry_better.jpg}
    (view changes)
  2. page home edited {studio.jpg} ... Art Studio! The The art studio ... and reflection. Visual Arts i…

    {studio.jpg}
    ...
    Art Studio!
    The

    The
    art studio
    ...
    and reflection.
    Visual Arts in Brookline
    Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    (view changes)
  3. page home edited ... {studio.jpg} Welcome to the Lincoln School Art Studio! The art studio is always buzzing wi…
    ...
    {studio.jpg}
    Welcome to the Lincoln School Art Studio!
    The art studio is always buzzing with activity! Each class in grades K-8 comes to art once a week. Each year students do 3D sculpture (like clay, paper, or cardboard), painting, drawing, printmaking, and collage. Students also learn about art history and make connections to learning that happens in their classrooms. The art studio is a place for "serious play", discovery, exploration, self-expression, development of craft, observation, and reflection.
    Visual Arts in Brookline
    Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    (view changes)
  4. page 8th Grade edited ... Here is a link to the self-assessment sheet given as homework after each assignment is complet…
    ...
    Here is a link to the self-assessment sheet given as homework after each assignment is completed:
    Past Assignments:
    Reduction Print Self-Portraits:
    Eight graders make reduction print self-portraits. First students were asked to make a self-portrait that reflects themself as an 8th grader. The portrait is then transferred onto an easy-cut linoleum block.
    Self-Portraits
    under construction

    (view changes)
  5. page home edited Welcome to Art at Lincoln School! {studio.jpg} This page will be updated periodically with …

    Welcome to Art at Lincoln School!
    {studio.jpg}
    This page will be updated periodically with information aboutWelcome to the things students are learning in the art studio.Lincoln School Art Studio!
    Visual Arts in Brookline
    Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    (view changes)
  6. page 2nd Grade edited ... -- excerpt from Brookline Visual Arts Learning Expectations Past Assignments: Color Invento…
    ...
    -- excerpt from Brookline Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    Past Assignments:
    Color Inventors:
    The second graders are practicing color mixing with paint and remembering important art vocabulary terms like primary and secondary colors. Second graders know that the primary colors are red, yellow, and blue, and that they are important because they can't be mixed from any other colors and they are used to mix almost all the other colors in the world. Second graders also know that secondary colors (green, orange, and purple) are the result of mixing two primary colors together. Recently we added the word "tertiary" to our vocabulary. We learned that a tertiary color is a color that lives in between the primaries and secondaries on the color wheel. Tertiary colors have names that are hyphenated, like yellow-green or red-orange. We practiced making a color wheel that includes primary, secondary, and tertiary colors and got some beautiful results!
    {colorwheelssecond.jpg}
    (view changes)
  7. page 8th Grade edited ... As students are preparing for the high school experience, they are interested in knowing who t…
    ...
    As students are preparing for the high school experience, they are interested in knowing who they are, what they know, and what they can do. Using this awareness as a primary focus, the art curriculum engages seventh and eighth grade students in experiences that combine acquired craftsmanship, identified personal strengths and preferences, and the chance to create highly personal representations that give voice to these young artists.
    -- excerpt from the Brookline Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    4.15.08Here is a link to the self-assessment sheet given as homework after each assignment is completed:
    Past Assignments:
    Reduction Print Self-Portraits:

    Eight graders are completingmake reduction print
    ...
    that reflects their currentthemself as an 8th grader. The portrait is then transferred onto an easy-cut linoleum block.
    (view changes)
  8. page 7th Grade edited ... As students are preparing for the high school experience, they are interested in knowing who t…
    ...
    As students are preparing for the high school experience, they are interested in knowing who they are, what they know, and what they can do. Using this awareness as a primary focus, the art curriculum engages seventh and eighth grade students in experiences that combine acquired craftsmanship, identified personal strengths and preferences, and the chance to create highly personal representations that give voice to these young artists.
    -- excerpt from the Brookline Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    This is a link to the assessment sheet given as homework after each assignment is completed:
    student grading assessment sheet.pdf
    4.15.08
    Past Assignments:
    Symbolic Self-Portraits:

    Seventh graders began making symbolic self-portraits from corrugated cardboard by thinking about what a symbolic self-portrait might look like. They considered ways of using symbols (something that represents something else by association or resemblance, especially a material object used to represent something invisible) to represent parts of their personalities. They were told that their symbolic self-portrait could be abstract or representational, and that it should visually express information about their personality. Other requirements included that the design be three-dimensional, at least 18" in any one dimension, have at least one kinetic (moving) part, contain both subtractive (cut into the surface) and additive (added onto the surface) elements, and be able to balance on its own without being propped up.
    First, students started brainstorming in their sketchbooks. They were asked to list their interests, goals, likes and dislikes, hobbies, and biographical information as a starting point. Symbols were chosen and then sketches of the final designs were made.
    ...
    {corey.jpg} Adding finishing touches with hot glue
    {will.jpg} Almost finished!
    ...
    self-assessment sheet. The link to that sheet is at the top of this page.
    Look for the finished symbolic self-portraits on display in the library!

    (view changes)
  9. page 6th Grade edited ... In grades five and six students easily find fault with their drawing skills. These artists are…
    ...
    In grades five and six students easily find fault with their drawing skills. These artists are becoming more aware that their art works will elicit responses from others. Their desire to enhance the realistic quality of their drawings needs to be supported with new understanding of the qualities of space and depth. Working with 3D materials such as clay or wire helps them gain a new understanding of space. This can help them gain the confidence necessary to translate new ideas about space into their two-dimensional work. Students are motivated to gain genuine understanding of the art processes and considerable command of the tools and materials as they seek to create representations that incorporate what they see, what they know, what they understand, and how they feel in a clear, powerful way.
    -- excerpt from Brookline Visual Arts Learning Expectations
    3.4.08Past Assignments:
    Single Point Perspective:

    Sixth graders are learning ways of representing three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface by using the technique of single-point linear perspective. This technique was originally developed by artists like Leonardo da Vinci during the Italian Renaissance (around 1500 CE), and involves establishing a horizon line and vanishing point. Orthogonal lines (lines connecting to the vanishing point) are drawn between the front faces of the buildings and the vanishing point to represent the sides of the structures.
    {Lastsupper.jpg} This is an example of how Leonardo Da Vinci used single-point perspective in his painting "The Last Supper".
    (view changes)

More